The Quick Guides throughout this site feature resources focused on specific wound care clinical topics, but there is value in aggregating them all in one easy-to-navigate section. Look below for practical, peer-reviewed articles and other useful resources meant to help you improve your patient outcomes, starting today!

Debridement options: BEAMS made easy

At one time or another, all wound care professionals encounter a chronic wound, defined as a wound that fails to heal in an orderly and timely manner. Globally, about 67 million people (1% to 5% of the world’s population) suffer chronic wounds. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million people and cost more
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Dermatologic difficulties: Skin problems in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and phlebolymphedema

Skin problems associated with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and phlebolymphedema are common and often difficult to treat. The CVI cycle of skin and soft tissue injury from chronic disease processes can be unrelenting. If not properly identified and treated, these skin problems can impede the prompt treatment of lymphedema and reduce a patient’s quality of
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FAQs for pressure ulcer staging

Staging pressure ulcers can be challenging. Below are some common questions—and answers—about staging. Q. If a pressure ulcer heals (completely epithelialized over), but later reopens at the same site, how should it be staged? A. According to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, if a pressureulcer reopens in the same site, the ulcer should be listed at
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How are you differentiating the “big three”?

BY: NANCY MORGAN, RN, BSN, MBA, WOCN, WCC, CWCMS, DWC Lower extremity ulcers are often referred as the “big three”—arterial ulcers, venous ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. Are you able to properly identify them based on their characteristics? Sometimes, it’s a challenge to differentiate them. Arterial ulcers tend occur the tips of toes, over phalangeal heads,
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How dietary protein intake promotes wound healing

Nutrition is a critical factor in the wound healing process, with adequate protein intake essential to the successful healing of a wound. Patients with both chronic and acute wounds, such as postsurgical wounds or pressure ulcers, require an increased amount of protein to ensure complete and timely healing of their wounds. Elderly patients with wounds
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Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

Every year, 1.9% of patients with diabetes develop foot ulcers. Of those, 15% to 20% undergo an amputation within 5 years of ulcer onset. During their lifetimes, an estimated 25% of diabetic patients develop a foot ulcer. This article discusses use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in treating diabetic foot ulcers, presenting several case studies.
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Inlow’s 60-Second Diabetic Foot Screen

This tool can help screen persons with diabetes to prevent or treat diabetes-related foot ulcers and/or limb-threatening complications. Find it here.
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Is your wound-cleansing practice up to date?

With so much focus on dressing choices, it’s easy to forget the importance of wound cleansing. Cleaning a wound removes loose debris and planktonic (free-floating) bacteria, provides protection to promote an optimal environment for healing, and facilitates wound assessment by optimizing visualization of the wound. You should clean a wound every time you change a
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Managing venous stasis ulcers

Venous disease, which encompasses all conditions caused by or related to diseased or abnormal veins, affects about 15% of adults. When mild, it rarely poses a problem, but as it worsens, it can become crippling and chronic. Chronic venous disease often is overlooked by primary and cardiovascular care providers, who underestimate its magnitude and impact.
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Pressure ulcer guideline syntheses

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) makes it easy to compare guidelines for managing pressure ulcers: See Management of pressure ulcers and Prevention of pressure ulcers.
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Preventing healthcare-associated infections

Resources from the CDC.
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Quality-improvement initiative: Classifying and documenting surgical wounds

For surgical patients, operative wound classification is crucial in predicting postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) and associated risks. Information about a patient’s wound typically is collected by circulating registered nurses (RNs) and documented at the end of every surgical procedure. Because of its predictive value, wound classification plays a valuable role in driving quality-improvement (QI)
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